How to get graphic designers excited about your wireframes

How to get designers excited about your wireframes

How to get designers excited about your wireframes

As a usability or user experience architect one is very passionate about their output, and why not. You have spent long hours banging your head trying to understand requirements, getting stakeholders excited and convincing your model to the business. When it comes to getting your design implemented, that’s when you have a visual designer at hand who is brought in to develop your vision into reality.

Then there are others who involve user experience designers in this process and have then get involved at a certain stage of development so as to have them limber up to the main event of creating the user interface. I am not drawing any conclusions here but I do have an opinion that a designer is a designer. And if he is designing a website or an application, he is good at his game. To create fantastic visual interpretation of the user interface. Graphic designers have a special significance in a creative team because they have the tendency to think out of the box. I like that attribute to be associated and be an asset in a product development team.

Let me start by underlining the importance of good graphic designers –

  • They thrive on challenges
  • They always think out of the box
  • They are not limited by conformity
  • They know their game, and goal is to create the wow factor with attention to detailing
  • Always listening, always curious

A good designer would always be a good learner. If you trace all the design evolution till date in software and web, designers have been always been there tinkering with the latest in technology and business and software solutions. They have always been working hand in hand with core teams and absorbing skills that complimented their own core skills. So, when it comes to user experience, I see no different situation.

Here are some points one which I follow when involving a designer in a project. I have created this list based on my personal experience with them as a user experience professional.

  • Give them an orientation about them about the software or product. Allow them to absorb and understand the product. They will feel a lot more engaged with their work.
  • Identify and share challenges with them. Engage them by taking critical inputs or solutions from them. They will feel as an important part of the team.
  • Engage them early, even if their work is not yet taken off in the project time line. It gives them some breathing space to creatively limber and be prepared with ideas and thoughts that they can bring in on a tight schedule.
  • If your disagree with their designs, do not criticize them. Instead challenge their solution by giving your counter argument on why it would not work. No one appreciates negative criticism but everyone respects and accepts rational debates.
  • Sometimes you need to cut a slack and focus on the critical issues. Designers tend to get bogged down by creative issues that you might not find critical. Instead of telling them to hurry things up, your should assist them plan design tasks based on criticality.
  • Balance your appreciation with criticism. Excess of both are not good for our product. You need to know when to balance things by adding the right amount. This is applicable even when things are going in the extreme ends (good or bad i,e).
  • Even if its not their concern, it sometimes feels good to share some insights with them to address certain issues. And vica versa, you should take inputs from them and if possible consider its application, and perhaps apply them. Its no rocket science that most of the times, if not always, experience teaches is more than books do.
  • Given them responsibilities and watch them become responsible. I am yet to see a designer who has not taken his responsibility seriously. They may not be good at taking big ones but when set in small sets, they tend to do wonders.
  • Acknowledge their contribution to the larger group in your organisation. They will appreciate it and also take pride in their work.

I guess the last point holds true for all of us too, doesn’t it?

[Image copyright: logolitic.com]

Advertisements

One thought on “How to get graphic designers excited about your wireframes

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s